larryhammer: a symbol used in a traditional Iceland magic spell of protection (iceland)
*honk* *glug*

Something is blooming. In profusion. And my sinuses do not approve.

*HONNNNNNNK!* *snf* *glug*
larryhammer: topless woman lying prone with Sappho painted on her back, label: "Greek poetry is sexy" (classics)
It occurs to me that I've never actually linked to Bartleby's rich collection of poetry anthologies, the source of several I've reported on here (including Poems of Places).

And speaking of high art, given the number of secondary school and university productions of Into the Woods, it's no surprise there's a lot of low budget Milky Whites. My fave. (via)

And speaking of failures, this demo of supposed historical rapid-fire archery (via) is getting critiqued (via) a lot.

---L.

Subject quote from "Lines on the View from St. Leonard’s," Thomas Campbell.
larryhammer: topless woman lying prone with Sappho painted on her back, label: "Greek poetry is sexy" (classics)
Some reports on the various dead:

Two substantial fragments of poems by Sappho have been found, the end of one and the beginning of another. (via several) Bonus: 32 translations of Sappho's most famous poem. (via)

Disturbing reports that axolotls may be extinct in the wild. (via)

Pete Seeger and some friends sing "Forever Young."

Subject quote from Sappho translated by William Carlos Williams.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (for you)
A walk-through of XKCD strip number 1110, including a link for seeing the image in a panning, zooming window.

How the US health-care system wastes G$750 annually. In case anyone overseas wonders why this is such a big deal. (via lost in browser tabs)

Of more local interest: tax cuts don't lead to economic growth, per historical data.

Word Spy's earliest citation for mansplain is 2009. Does anyone recall it being used earlier? Or better yet, have a cite?

(Subject line is Swinburne parodying himself.)

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (for you)
A walk-through of XKCD strip number 1110, including a link for seeing the image in a panning, zooming window.

How the US health-care system wastes G$750 annually. In case anyone overseas wonders why this is such a big deal. (via lost in browser tabs)

Of more local interest: tax cuts don't lead to economic growth, per historical data.

Word Spy's earliest citation for mansplain is 2009. Does anyone recall it being used earlier? Or better yet, have a cite?

(Subject line is Swinburne parodying himself.)

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (vanished away)
During those early teenage years when I was old enough to take the Metro by myself but too young to get a job, I spent much of my summertimes haunting the tourist attractions of downtown Washington, DC -- particularly the museums on the Mall, Smithsonians and otherwise. Largely, of course, because they were free, always an important consideration for the job-free, but also because they are enormous warehouses of interesting cultural, artistic, scientific, and several other kinds of -ics artifacts. 'Cause, yanno, geeky kid.

One of the more interesting places in terms of being a Storage Attic On Display is the American History Museum. In addition to the sorts of exhibits you'd expect from a name like that, including more varieties of cultural impedimenta than you'd think possible, there's entire wings left over from the days when it was still called the Museum of History and Technology -- on such topics as the history of photography, atom smashers, printing and typography, glass- and ceramic-making, et sprawling cetera. On the third floor, there was one of the zappy sorts of large van de graaf machines hooked up to a button you could push. In the basement, a monumental marble statue of George Washington wearing a toga ...

(Pause to let that sink in. What's worse is he's not wearing a tunic, just the toga. I understand the reason they keep this thing around is it's one of the few likenesses made while Washington was alive, and for the faces of tourists when they round a corner and are suddenly confronted by this ... Thing.)

... and -- um, where was I? Oh yes, another amazing monstrosity: a scale model of the Capitol Building, a few meters long, made of blown glass. This was parked just outside the glass exhibit, or rather, the latter provided the excuse for displaying it.

I've been back to DC only a few times since leaving home, and over the years, many of my fond memories are no more. The Wonders of Nature exhibit tucked into a back corner of the Natural History Museum, used to display pretty things for their own sake, such as an entire wall of morpho butterflies and a ceremonial headdress made entirely of iridescent red hummingbird feathers, is long gone, along with Ancient Civilizations -- they wanted the space for an IMAX theater. And so on. New things come, old things change, or vanish in further construction.

A friend who's just back from DC has just informed me that the glass Capitol I'd directed her toward has not be on display for 18 years.

I think I need to recuse myself from offering any further tourism advice for my hometown.

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (vanished away)
During those early teenage years when I was old enough to take the Metro by myself but too young to get a job, I spent much of my summertimes haunting the tourist attractions of downtown Washington, DC -- particularly the museums on the Mall, Smithsonians and otherwise. Largely, of course, because they were free, always an important consideration for the job-free, but also because they are enormous warehouses of interesting cultural, artistic, scientific, and several other kinds of -ics artifacts. 'Cause, yanno, geeky kid.

One of the more interesting places in terms of being a Storage Attic On Display is the American History Museum. In addition to the sorts of exhibits you'd expect from a name like that, including more varieties of cultural impedimenta than you'd think possible, there's entire wings left over from the days when it was still called the Museum of History and Technology -- on such topics as the history of photography, atom smashers, printing and typography, glass- and ceramic-making, et sprawling cetera. On the third floor, there was one of the zappy sorts of large van de graaf machines hooked up to a button you could push. In the basement, a monumental marble statue of George Washington wearing a toga ...

(Pause to let that sink in. What's worse is he's not wearing a tunic, just the toga. I understand the reason they keep this thing around is it's one of the few likenesses made while Washington was alive, and for the faces of tourists when they round a corner and are suddenly confronted by this ... Thing.)

... and -- um, where was I? Oh yes, another amazing monstrosity: a scale model of the Capitol Building, a few meters long, made of blown glass. This was parked just outside the glass exhibit, or rather, the latter provided the excuse for displaying it.

I've been back to DC only a few times since leaving home, and over the years, many of my fond memories are no more. The Wonders of Nature exhibit tucked into a back corner of the Natural History Museum, used to display pretty things for their own sake, such as an entire wall of morpho butterflies and a ceremonial headdress made entirely of iridescent red hummingbird feathers, is long gone, along with Ancient Civilizations -- they wanted the space for an IMAX theater. And so on. New things come, old things change, or vanish in further construction.

A friend who's just back from DC has just informed me that the glass Capitol I'd directed her toward has not be on display for 18 years.

I think I need to recuse myself from offering any further tourism advice for my hometown.

---L.
larryhammer: pen-and-ink drawing of an annoyed woman dressed as a Heian-era male courtier saying "......" (argh)
Proposition: anyone who thinks that "using humor" equates to "taking something lightly" has completely misread A Modest Proposal.

Discuss.

---L.
larryhammer: pen-and-ink drawing of an annoyed woman dressed as a Heian-era male courtier saying "......" (argh)
Proposition: anyone who thinks that "using humor" equates to "taking something lightly" has completely misread A Modest Proposal.

Discuss.

---L.
larryhammer: pen-and-ink drawing of an annoyed woman dressed as a Heian-era male courtier saying "......" (crossdressing)
"Greeeeen and yeller / greeeeen and yeller / Mother be quick I've got to be sick and lay me down to die"

I've lost the attribution, and it's only two related studies, but it's still suggestive enough to pass along: Kindergartners who just made the age cut-off for enrolling, and so are younger than the average for their class, are diagnosed as ADHD at a higher rate than those who just missed the cut-off and so are the oldest kids in the next class, even though they are just days apart in age. In other words, being young is being mistaken for a clinical condition.

Are we surprised?

---L.
larryhammer: pen-and-ink drawing of an annoyed woman dressed as a Heian-era male courtier saying "......" (crossdressing)
"Greeeeen and yeller / greeeeen and yeller / Mother be quick I've got to be sick and lay me down to die"

I've lost the attribution, and it's only two related studies, but it's still suggestive enough to pass along: Kindergartners who just made the age cut-off for enrolling, and so are younger than the average for their class, are diagnosed as ADHD at a higher rate than those who just missed the cut-off and so are the oldest kids in the next class, even though they are just days apart in age. In other words, being young is being mistaken for a clinical condition.

Are we surprised?

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Since all the cool kidsTM are doing this meme, it must time for me as well. Baaaa.

Anyone who wants a DreamWidth invite code can use one of the following -- if one's already taken, go on to the next:

BG42QXT2XT96WAAAKRBV
TAYR72RP8NS65AAAKRBW
64XF7BMZCJTS7AAAKRBX
M77M43RFHM5TCAAAKRBY
PJKG7T3AMCP53AAAKRBZ
J7NFPRB6GEMT2AAAKRB2
2TD4KNHEY6PDHAAAKRB3
7VVZPDFVMF64YAAAAQP4 used
MNV92PK3PB297AAAD5NR used

I intend to live primarily on LiveJournal in the near term, and for now use DW as a poetry journal, but if anyone wants to move for any of various reasons. (What I personally find most irritating is the new inability to comment anonymously while logged in to LJ, and that if you comment with an alternate journal, LJ automatically logs you in to the alternate account.* I understand the privacy concerns with the crossposting of comments to locked posts, though, even though it doesn't apply to me.)

---L.

* ETA: Okay, it looks like they've changed this -- while you don't have the option of switching which account you are logged in under, you are no longer switched to being on the alternate account.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Since all the cool kidsTM are doing this meme, it must time for me as well. Baaaa.

Anyone who wants a DreamWidth invite code can use one of the following -- if one's already taken, go on to the next:

BG42QXT2XT96WAAAKRBV
TAYR72RP8NS65AAAKRBW
64XF7BMZCJTS7AAAKRBX
M77M43RFHM5TCAAAKRBY
PJKG7T3AMCP53AAAKRBZ
J7NFPRB6GEMT2AAAKRB2
2TD4KNHEY6PDHAAAKRB3
7VVZPDFVMF64YAAAAQP4 used
MNV92PK3PB297AAAD5NR used

I intend to live primarily on LiveJournal in the near term, and for now use DW as a poetry journal, but if anyone wants to move for any of various reasons. (What I personally find most irritating is the new inability to comment anonymously while logged in to LJ, and that if you comment with an alternate journal, LJ automatically logs you in to the alternate account.* I understand the privacy concerns with the crossposting of comments to locked posts, though, even though it doesn't apply to me.)

---L.

* ETA: Okay, it looks like they've changed this -- while you don't have the option of switching which account you are logged in under, you are no longer switched to being on the alternate account.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (WTF?)
More and more, I find myself resenting it when things wear out.

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (WTF?)
More and more, I find myself resenting it when things wear out.

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (WTF?)
Dear Subconscious,

You can stop with the Aeneid-based dreams any night now.

No love,
Me

* * * * *

Dear Drivers in the Near Lane of a Multilane Street Who Stop for Me As I'm Crossing,

I appreciate that this is a crosswalk-law state and you are yielding me the right-of-way. I really do -- far too many drivers ignore pedestrians.

However, comma.

When I'm on a bicycle, I'm not a pedestrian -- I'm a vehicle. Furthermore, when I'm waiting at the median for a break in traffic on your side of the street, I'm never in a crosswalk -- I'm careful about that. So that's two ways in which you, and not I, have the right-of-way. But the real reason I always wave you on is that while you are stopped in the near lane, drivers in the far lane cannot see me and so are not stopping, and I for one am not going to ride into their path.

So please, drive on. I can wait, and it will make everyone's rush-hour experience better.

Sincerely yours,
Me

* * * * *

Dear Producers of the Cross Game Anime,

Why the hell did you compress the entire first volume into a single opening episode?

No, wait, my apologies. That was rude of me, and in any case not the right question. What I really want to know is how the hell did you successfully adapt volume 1 into a single episode? Because, like, it's all there, and it works even better than the manga.

Much love,
Me

* * * * *

Dear Subconscious,

No, setting it in a contemporary hotel does not disguise it, not when Turnius, Lavinia, and Aeneas are named characters. You'll have to work harder if you want me to not notice.

If your intention was to creep me out, having Turnius and Lavinia shagging in the daytime manager's office worked. Bonus points for that. Now please. Stop. It.

Still no love,
Me
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (WTF?)
Dear Subconscious,

You can stop with the Aeneid-based dreams any night now.

No love,
Me

* * * * *

Dear Drivers in the Near Lane of a Multilane Street Who Stop for Me As I'm Crossing,

I appreciate that this is a crosswalk-law state and you are yielding me the right-of-way. I really do -- far too many drivers ignore pedestrians.

However, comma.

When I'm on a bicycle, I'm not a pedestrian -- I'm a vehicle. Furthermore, when I'm waiting at the median for a break in traffic on your side of the street, I'm never in a crosswalk -- I'm careful about that. So that's two ways in which you, and not I, have the right-of-way. But the real reason I always wave you on is that while you are stopped in the near lane, drivers in the far lane cannot see me and so are not stopping, and I for one am not going to ride into their path.

So please, drive on. I can wait, and it will make everyone's rush-hour experience better.

Sincerely yours,
Me

* * * * *

Dear Producers of the Cross Game Anime,

Why the hell did you compress the entire first volume into a single opening episode?

No, wait, my apologies. That was rude of me, and in any case not the right question. What I really want to know is how the hell did you successfully adapt volume 1 into a single episode? Because, like, it's all there, and it works even better than the manga.

Much love,
Me

* * * * *

Dear Subconscious,

No, setting it in a contemporary hotel does not disguise it, not when Turnius, Lavinia, and Aeneas are named characters. You'll have to work harder if you want me to not notice.

If your intention was to creep me out, having Turnius and Lavinia shagging in the daytime manager's office worked. Bonus points for that. Now please. Stop. It.

Still no love,
Me
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (some guy)
Last night I ate for the first time at Claim Jumper,* a chain steakhouse with a reputation for superabundant servings. What I found was that the reputation is carefully crafted.

I'm slow at these things, so it took me a while to catch on. The first thing that struck me about the interior was the size: giant stone pillars supporting thick wooden beams, with decorations that evoke the Western American frontier with touches of Victorian refinement.** It wasn't until later that I noticed that the beams and pillars are far larger than they really need to be, and closer together. Most places that large, the impression given is space and airiness -- Claim Jumper imposes on you. Massive and cluttered, with few clear lines of sight. When the food arrived, the portions are not only way too large, but presented to look large: wide-rimmed plates with food piled high. And you eat this on a table that's not only a thick slab but high-set, making even me feel child-sized. Only then did I finally realize:

The entire place is designed to make you feel small -- and thereby make the portions seem even bigger than they already are.

The food was, indeed, good.*** And I do like me a buttermilk biscuit. But I still walked out feeling a bit pissed off at being so heavily manipulated.

Architecture: in skilled hands, it can be a powerful tool.


* For a friend's birthday -- and no, we didn't out her, so we don't know what song the wait-staff sing there.

** Far less mining-related paraphernalia than I expected, actually -- bare nods to the name.

*** Though I tried not to think about how much corn syrup was in the apple glazing and the sweet stuffing.


---L.

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