larryhammer: topless woman lying prone with Sappho painted on her back, label: "Greek poetry is sexy" (greek poetry is sexy)
Things and thing:

Report on the contents of a medicine chest from a c.130BCE shipwreck. I'm not quite sure calling it a first-aid kit is as interesting as calling it a medicine chest, or maybe a doctor's kit if you need to make it colloquial. (via)

A truly excellent index. (via)

---L.
larryhammer: topless woman lying prone with Sappho painted on her back, label: "Greek poetry is sexy" (greek poetry is sexy)
Things and thing:

Report on the contents of a medicine chest from a c.130BCE shipwreck. I'm not quite sure calling it a first-aid kit is as interesting as calling it a medicine chest, or maybe a doctor's kit if you need to make it colloquial. (via)

A truly excellent index. (via)

---L.
larryhammer: Yotsuba Koiwai running, label: "enjoy everything" (enjoy everything)
I don't often brag on my family, but given this, I have to. Or at least, really want to.

The past year, my mother has been occupying herself with translating Rilke. She also got some bookbinding lessons from Janni this past winter. It eventually occurred to her that with a calligraphy pen, she could combine the two projects. I haven't seen the result yet -- she is working on one last poem* -- but I would have if my portion of the DC trip** had not been canceled by an improper collation of my appendix.*** So instead, she's sent me a photocopy.

Pretty neat stuff. And I don't just say that because I've always envied her calligraphic hand. It's all short poems, from Book of Hours, Book of Images, and New Poems. I'd post one to show off, but I don't have permission.

So you'll just have to take my word for it that I have some cool parents.


* "Die Kathedrale," and like her I do not understand how to read the last three lines.

** Which was, btw, for the internment of my uncle (my mother's brother) in Arlington National Cemetery.

*** Regarding which, the rebinding has been a slow, manual process, but continues well.


---L.
larryhammer: Yotsuba Koiwai running, label: "enjoy everything" (enjoy everything)
I don't often brag on my family, but given this, I have to. Or at least, really want to.

The past year, my mother has been occupying herself with translating Rilke. She also got some bookbinding lessons from Janni this past winter. It eventually occurred to her that with a calligraphy pen, she could combine the two projects. I haven't seen the result yet -- she is working on one last poem* -- but I would have if my portion of the DC trip** had not been canceled by an improper collation of my appendix.*** So instead, she's sent me a photocopy.

Pretty neat stuff. And I don't just say that because I've always envied her calligraphic hand. It's all short poems, from Book of Hours, Book of Images, and New Poems. I'd post one to show off, but I don't have permission.

So you'll just have to take my word for it that I have some cool parents.


* "Die Kathedrale," and like her I do not understand how to read the last three lines.

** Which was, btw, for the internment of my uncle (my mother's brother) in Arlington National Cemetery.

*** Regarding which, the rebinding has been a slow, manual process, but continues well.


---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
"T" shirts (via) for all your typographic fashionista needs.

Jonathan Coulton's "Shop Vac," (via) for all your typographic nerdipopcultudisatire needs.

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
"T" shirts (via) for all your typographic fashionista needs.

Jonathan Coulton's "Shop Vac," (via) for all your typographic nerdipopcultudisatire needs.

---L.
larryhammer: a wisp of smoke, label: "it comes in curlicues, spirals as it twirls" (curlicues)
[livejournal.com profile] kateelliott on why "show don't tell" works:
Humans like to figure out other humans. We evolved to observe, interact, gossip, and create relationships. Creating a relationship between the characters is not all a novelist does. We as writers are also creating a relationship between the character and the reader.
Don't give us the adjectives of your conception of the character, give us the character in (inter)action.

And while I'm linking, I might as well plop in my current collection. A lot of long reading in this batch, for some reason: Even if, as I suspect, all of you are secretly ninja and so already know that. That I have no proof that any of you are ninja only goes to show how good you are at it.

---L.
larryhammer: a wisp of smoke, label: "it comes in curlicues, spirals as it twirls" (curlicues)
[livejournal.com profile] kateelliott on why "show don't tell" works:
Humans like to figure out other humans. We evolved to observe, interact, gossip, and create relationships. Creating a relationship between the characters is not all a novelist does. We as writers are also creating a relationship between the character and the reader.
Don't give us the adjectives of your conception of the character, give us the character in (inter)action.

And while I'm linking, I might as well plop in my current collection. A lot of long reading in this batch, for some reason: Even if, as I suspect, all of you are secretly ninja and so already know that. That I have no proof that any of you are ninja only goes to show how good you are at it.

---L.
larryhammer: Enceladus (the moon, not the mythological being), label: "Enceladus is sexy" (astronomy)
Link, link, linkity link. Most of them about art. ---L.
larryhammer: Enceladus (the moon, not the mythological being), label: "Enceladus is sexy" (astronomy)
Link, link, linkity link. Most of them about art. ---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Some quotes for those who might appreciate them:
  1. Lingua Latina saepe dicitur mortua esse. Coleus! Modum iam pridem meridiatur. Iam diu autem multa verba facit dormiens. Re vera, non potes eam in silentium redigere. Circuspice—Lingua Latina se pandit ubique tanquam toga vilis.

  2. There is one characteristic which may be safely said to belong to nearly all happily-married couples—that of desiring to see equally happy marriages among their young friends; and in some cases, where their wishes are strong and circumstances seem favourable to the exertion of their own efforts, they may even embark upon the perilous but delightful course of helping those persons whose minds are as yet not made up, to form a decision respecting this important crisis in life, and this done, to assist in clearing the way in order that this decision may forthwith be acted upon.

  3. 53. Repeat steps 45–52 on the other side.
    55. Squash fold.
    58. Repeat steps 55–57 on the right.
    59. Repeat steps 45–53 for the second head.
    60. Repeat steps 55–59 behind for the third head.


  4. A Midsummer Night's Dream remains an enchanting work after four hundred years, but few would argue that it cuts to the very heart of human behavior. What it does do is take, and give, a positive satisfaction in the joyous possibilities of verbal expression.

  5. As a new face [The Times New Roman] should, by the grace of God and the art of man, have been broad and open, generous and ample; instead, by the vice of Mammon and the misery of the machine, it is bigoted and narrow, mean and puritan.
The Answers:
  1. Henry Beard, X-Treme Latin: Lingua Latina Extrema (London: Headline Book Publishing, 2005).
  2. Sybil G. Brinton, Old Friends and New Fancies: An Imaginary Sequel to the Novels of Jane Austen (Naperville, IL: Sourcebook Landmark, 2007 reprint of the 1914 edition).
  3. John Montroll, "Three-Headed Dragon," in Mythological Creatures and the Chinese Zodiac in Origami (New York: Dover Publications, 1996).
  4. Bill Bryson, Shakespeare: The World as Stage (New York: HarperCollins, 2007).
  5. John Morrison, A Tally of Type, 3rd ed. (Jaffrey, NH: David R. Godine, 1999).
The Annotations:
  1. Yes, I'm dubious about his Latin, too.
  2. Yes, a sequel to all six novels at once. Edward and Elinor Ferrars have one of the Darcy livings, for a start, and Mary Crawford is in the orbit of Sir Walter Eliot.
  3. I have now proven it is possible to fold this in 15cm paper, but the result is so small as to be barely worth the effort. Also, Tiamat looks so silly shrunk to 4cm long. Undignified.
  4. A brief but generally sensible work, which breaks no new ground.
  5. To be fair to Morrison, he's putting these words in William Morris's mouth. But I more or less agree.
---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Some quotes for those who might appreciate them:
  1. Lingua Latina saepe dicitur mortua esse. Coleus! Modum iam pridem meridiatur. Iam diu autem multa verba facit dormiens. Re vera, non potes eam in silentium redigere. Circuspice—Lingua Latina se pandit ubique tanquam toga vilis.

  2. There is one characteristic which may be safely said to belong to nearly all happily-married couples—that of desiring to see equally happy marriages among their young friends; and in some cases, where their wishes are strong and circumstances seem favourable to the exertion of their own efforts, they may even embark upon the perilous but delightful course of helping those persons whose minds are as yet not made up, to form a decision respecting this important crisis in life, and this done, to assist in clearing the way in order that this decision may forthwith be acted upon.

  3. 53. Repeat steps 45–52 on the other side.
    55. Squash fold.
    58. Repeat steps 55–57 on the right.
    59. Repeat steps 45–53 for the second head.
    60. Repeat steps 55–59 behind for the third head.


  4. A Midsummer Night's Dream remains an enchanting work after four hundred years, but few would argue that it cuts to the very heart of human behavior. What it does do is take, and give, a positive satisfaction in the joyous possibilities of verbal expression.

  5. As a new face [The Times New Roman] should, by the grace of God and the art of man, have been broad and open, generous and ample; instead, by the vice of Mammon and the misery of the machine, it is bigoted and narrow, mean and puritan.
The Answers:
  1. Henry Beard, X-Treme Latin: Lingua Latina Extrema (London: Headline Book Publishing, 2005).
  2. Sybil G. Brinton, Old Friends and New Fancies: An Imaginary Sequel to the Novels of Jane Austen (Naperville, IL: Sourcebook Landmark, 2007 reprint of the 1914 edition).
  3. John Montroll, "Three-Headed Dragon," in Mythological Creatures and the Chinese Zodiac in Origami (New York: Dover Publications, 1996).
  4. Bill Bryson, Shakespeare: The World as Stage (New York: HarperCollins, 2007).
  5. John Morrison, A Tally of Type, 3rd ed. (Jaffrey, NH: David R. Godine, 1999).
The Annotations:
  1. Yes, I'm dubious about his Latin, too.
  2. Yes, a sequel to all six novels at once. Edward and Elinor Ferrars have one of the Darcy livings, for a start, and Mary Crawford is in the orbit of Sir Walter Eliot.
  3. I have now proven it is possible to fold this in 15cm paper, but the result is so small as to be barely worth the effort. Also, Tiamat looks so silly shrunk to 4cm long. Undignified.
  4. A brief but generally sensible work, which breaks no new ground.
  5. To be fair to Morrison, he's putting these words in William Morris's mouth. But I more or less agree.
---L.

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