larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (disappearance)
Kate Beaton writes about working for two years at a mining site: Ducks. (via all over)

Kawehi covers NIN's "Closer." (via?)

Shakespeare's plays summarized as three-panel comic strips. Well, mostly three panels. (via?)

(Up half the night coughing. Bleagh.)

---L.

Subject quote from "Elastic Heart," Sia.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (La!)
The drama department of the University of Kansas is putting on a original pronunciation production of A Midsummer Night's Dream. As in, Irish Elizabethan vowels and all. Video of a three minute sample in the link. And, lo! -- the poetry rhymes! exactly! -- in the original pronunciation.

WANT. TO. GO.

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (La!)
The drama department of the University of Kansas is putting on a original pronunciation production of A Midsummer Night's Dream. As in, Irish Elizabethan vowels and all. Video of a three minute sample in the link. And, lo! -- the poetry rhymes! exactly! -- in the original pronunciation.

WANT. TO. GO.

---L.
larryhammer: Enceladus (the moon, not the mythological being), label: "Enceladus is sexy" (astronomy)
So I came across the phrase "poets alone should kiss and tell" and thought, "Oo, that'd make a good refrain for a ballade." Fortunately, before I got very far, I googled and found that, unfortunately, Dorothy Parker is way ahead of me here.

Which sounds like a good excuse to mention other things I've encountered on the 'net. 'Cause, peoples, there's some funky stuff out there. By the departments: And in conclusion, [livejournal.com profile] thefourthvine watches Star Trek: TOS for the first time -- hil-lar-ious writeups ensue for Amok Time, The Trouble with Tribbles, and City on the Edge of Forever. (via)

---L.
larryhammer: Enceladus (the moon, not the mythological being), label: "Enceladus is sexy" (astronomy)
So I came across the phrase "poets alone should kiss and tell" and thought, "Oo, that'd make a good refrain for a ballade." Fortunately, before I got very far, I googled and found that, unfortunately, Dorothy Parker is way ahead of me here.

Which sounds like a good excuse to mention other things I've encountered on the 'net. 'Cause, peoples, there's some funky stuff out there. By the departments: And in conclusion, [livejournal.com profile] thefourthvine watches Star Trek: TOS for the first time -- hil-lar-ious writeups ensue for Amok Time, The Trouble with Tribbles, and City on the Edge of Forever. (via)

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Catching up, with links. Which is not the same thing as catching up with links, though I'm doing that as well.

As part of working out why I like Yotsuba&! so much, I've started doing a critical reading of a chapter a day (as befitting a slice-of-life series with nearly daily episodes) in [livejournal.com profile] yotsubato: one, two, three so far (ETA: and now four). Feel free to read along and join in. Maybe by the time I reach volume 6, ADV will stop delaying the release.

I can see why Browning's Aristophanes' Apology was not as popular as Balaustion's Adventure -- and why I've bounced off it both times I've tried to read it. The narrator, Balaustion, is more or less the same character but her voice is nowhere near as appealing as before. It doesn't help that the Euripides play is this time done as a script direct instead of, as in the first poem, a retelling by a fourteen-year-old girl of a performance -- thus abandoning two layers of imagination and mediation. (See previous comments about Browning being less interesting without personas.) Not to mention, Herakles isn't as interesting a play as Alkestis. ---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Catching up, with links. Which is not the same thing as catching up with links, though I'm doing that as well.

As part of working out why I like Yotsuba&! so much, I've started doing a critical reading of a chapter a day (as befitting a slice-of-life series with nearly daily episodes) in [livejournal.com profile] yotsubato: one, two, three so far (ETA: and now four). Feel free to read along and join in. Maybe by the time I reach volume 6, ADV will stop delaying the release.

I can see why Browning's Aristophanes' Apology was not as popular as Balaustion's Adventure -- and why I've bounced off it both times I've tried to read it. The narrator, Balaustion, is more or less the same character but her voice is nowhere near as appealing as before. It doesn't help that the Euripides play is this time done as a script direct instead of, as in the first poem, a retelling by a fourteen-year-old girl of a performance -- thus abandoning two layers of imagination and mediation. (See previous comments about Browning being less interesting without personas.) Not to mention, Herakles isn't as interesting a play as Alkestis. ---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
I knew the new Collected Poems of William McGonagall has additional works not in his three collections. I hadn't known one is a previously unpublished play: a sub-sub-Shakespearean wonder called Jack o' the Cudgel, or The Hero of a Hundred Fights. (Note to [livejournal.com profile] angevin2: It's set in the court of Edward III.) Judging from extracts quoted in reviews, it's never been performed because it's unperformable.
Leave the minstrel, thou pig-headed giant, or I'll make you repent
For thou must know my name is Jack, and I hail from Kent.
Declaim that iambic pentameter with a straight face, if you can. Later, when the king knights him:
Sir Jack, I give thee land to the value of six hundred marks
In thine own native county of Kent, with beautiful parks
Also beautiful meadows and lovely flowers and trees
Where you can reside and enjoy yourself as you please.
Clearly, I need this.

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
I knew the new Collected Poems of William McGonagall has additional works not in his three collections. I hadn't known one is a previously unpublished play: a sub-sub-Shakespearean wonder called Jack o' the Cudgel, or The Hero of a Hundred Fights. (Note to [livejournal.com profile] angevin2: It's set in the court of Edward III.) Judging from extracts quoted in reviews, it's never been performed because it's unperformable.
Leave the minstrel, thou pig-headed giant, or I'll make you repent
For thou must know my name is Jack, and I hail from Kent.
Declaim that iambic pentameter with a straight face, if you can. Later, when the king knights him:
Sir Jack, I give thee land to the value of six hundred marks
In thine own native county of Kent, with beautiful parks
Also beautiful meadows and lovely flowers and trees
Where you can reside and enjoy yourself as you please.
Clearly, I need this.

---L.
larryhammer: topless woman lying prone with Sappho painted on her back, label: "Greek poetry is sexy" (classics)
Short shameful confession: I do not think of All's Well That Ends Well, Troilus and Cressida, and Measure for Measure as comedies -- they're problem plays, on the same lines as problem novels in YA. This analogy won't survive critical scrutiny, but thus my brain works.

For my next trick, I will assert that Shakespeare's sonnets are not a Petrarchan sonnet sequence but a problem sonnet sequence.



There's a type of manga that bemuses me when I stumble upon it. It's not a genre -- these seem to cross all genres. I've no better name for it but didactic manga -- seeming to exist to instruct, with story and fanservice and soap-opera-y bits tossed in to keep you reading on to the next nugget of information. Or maybe the audience just wants to learn how to cook curries (a recipe in every chapter!) or the mechanics of sex (set-up for that one's a couple married by arrangement who are both virgins -- the page of diagrams explaining how to remove a bra was especially amusing) and are skipping over the plot. Though not, I suspect, the fanservice.*

I've no doubt that somewhere out there are manga that teach automobile maintenance, or all about the natural history and hunting of whales. Uh, wait, that last's a those two are Western comic books and novel. Never mind.


* Random bits of titillation. Poorly motivated nudity and gratuitous panty-shots are especially common forms.


---L.
larryhammer: topless woman lying prone with Sappho painted on her back, label: "Greek poetry is sexy" (classics)
Short shameful confession: I do not think of All's Well That Ends Well, Troilus and Cressida, and Measure for Measure as comedies -- they're problem plays, on the same lines as problem novels in YA. This analogy won't survive critical scrutiny, but thus my brain works.

For my next trick, I will assert that Shakespeare's sonnets are not a Petrarchan sonnet sequence but a problem sonnet sequence.



There's a type of manga that bemuses me when I stumble upon it. It's not a genre -- these seem to cross all genres. I've no better name for it but didactic manga -- seeming to exist to instruct, with story and fanservice and soap-opera-y bits tossed in to keep you reading on to the next nugget of information. Or maybe the audience just wants to learn how to cook curries (a recipe in every chapter!) or the mechanics of sex (set-up for that one's a couple married by arrangement who are both virgins -- the page of diagrams explaining how to remove a bra was especially amusing) and are skipping over the plot. Though not, I suspect, the fanservice.*

I've no doubt that somewhere out there are manga that teach automobile maintenance, or all about the natural history and hunting of whales. Uh, wait, that last's a those two are Western comic books and novel. Never mind.


* Random bits of titillation. Poorly motivated nudity and gratuitous panty-shots are especially common forms.


---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Every year, the city puts on a free Shakespeare play in the park. Community theater, so it's rarely brill -- but it's rarely wretched* either, and sometimes the director brings good insights to the play. This year was The Taming of the Shrew. We went anyway.

And were surprised to see the frame story actually performed for once. Also, Kate and Petruchio almost were convincing -- if their chemistry and pure lustful heat had been continuous instead of sputtering, the final scene would have worked. Mind, "working" means making an otherwise fluffy play as disturbing as Measure for Measure -- but I'd like to see it do that. So I sat back and laughed at the well-turned slapstick and rapid-fire banter. There was one absolutely brilliant moment, when Petruchio showed up antic for his wedding and asks
Wherefore gaze this goodly company,
As if they saw some wondrous monument,
Some comet or —
and that, dear people, was when the baseball field next door started the fireworks.

The production stopped for ten minutes to watch, from the stage, the pretty booms bang off. A minute in, Petruchio said to the audience, "Now that's some monument." The cast worked in ad lib references for the rest of the play -- such as Petruchio's apology for being "in some part enforced <gestures towards the fireworks> to digress."


* The Midsummer with a Peter Pan Puck was probably the low point.


---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Default)
Every year, the city puts on a free Shakespeare play in the park. Community theater, so it's rarely brill -- but it's rarely wretched* either, and sometimes the director brings good insights to the play. This year was The Taming of the Shrew. We went anyway.

And were surprised to see the frame story actually performed for once. Also, Kate and Petruchio almost were convincing -- if their chemistry and pure lustful heat had been continuous instead of sputtering, the final scene would have worked. Mind, "working" means making an otherwise fluffy play as disturbing as Measure for Measure -- but I'd like to see it do that. So I sat back and laughed at the well-turned slapstick and rapid-fire banter. There was one absolutely brilliant moment, when Petruchio showed up antic for his wedding and asks
Wherefore gaze this goodly company,
As if they saw some wondrous monument,
Some comet or —
and that, dear people, was when the baseball field next door started the fireworks.

The production stopped for ten minutes to watch, from the stage, the pretty booms bang off. A minute in, Petruchio said to the audience, "Now that's some monument." The cast worked in ad lib references for the rest of the play -- such as Petruchio's apology for being "in some part enforced <gestures towards the fireworks> to digress."


* The Midsummer with a Peter Pan Puck was probably the low point.


---L.

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