larryhammer: a symbol used in a traditional Iceland magic spell of protection (iceland)
Visions and revisions which another will reverse:

Disney princesses as Marvel heroines. SOLD. (via)

Adding selfies to Western art. (via)

Placebo's awesome cover of "Running Up That Hill." Though now I want a cover with an explicitly trans reading. (via) (link fixed)

Join Aikin speculates at length on how Jane Austen might have revised Northanger Abbey if she hadn't shelved the project because of her final illness -- starting with much insightful commentary on Austen's art and methods. (via?)

---L.

Subject quote from "Running Up That Hill," Kate Bush.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (completed)
Building more roads does not decrease congestion: all the slack immediately is taken up by more drivers (via?)

"On weekends, we walk out to where the past used to be and where its stories remain." A long SF webcomic about the devastating emotional effects of time-travel. Someone make a note of this for next year's Hugos. (via)

"One Poem" by Heather Christie. (via)

---L.

Subject quote from "A Dead March," Cosmo Monkhouse.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Yotsuba runs)
What I've recently finished since my last post, including all the convalescence reading:

Xin: The Journey of the Monkey King - A three-issue indie comic book from a decade ago loosely based on Journey to the West -- as in, set in a technofantasy world with a gender-flipped Sanzen and telling an alternate origin story for Pig. The story itself is okay, for a value of "okay" that somehow manages to include cliched sexism, but I can see why the series never took off -- not enough of the background is explained, for one thing. FWIW, the art, while clearly American, looks inspired more by Chinese manhua than Japanese manga, as well it should.

How to Flirt with a Naked Werewolf by Molly Harper - Book 1 of the series, and I think The Art of Seducing a Naked Werewolf would have come off a little better with this context. Not bad -- and pretty funny, actually. I would have been nice if the inevitable pregnancyTM had been explained as a result of a certain instance of clearly unprotected sex rather than the failure of condoms to block werewolf supersperm.

Fair Game by Patricia Briggs - I'm not as quick to pounce on a new Alpha & Omega book as a Mercy Thompson book, because they haven't been as interesting -- which is why I wasn't expecting a series-important event quite this big. Right then. Third-and-a-half of a series you should start at the beginning with. (Or better yet, start with the Mercy Thompson books anyway -- a coyote shifter being more interesting than werewolves anyway.)

The Lark and the Wren by Mercedes Lackey - In which not!Menolly runs away to join not!Harper-Hall but ends up instead with the Gypsy Bardic Tinker People. It's more than a little annoying that this does the shoujo romance thing of, once the heroine is romantically tied off, two-thirds through, turning into his story instead, to the point of all but losing her POV -- until then, it had been a perfectly adequate young woman's bildungsroman. It is also startlingly heteronormative for a Lackey book: even while not!Menolly's plays for room and board in a brothel, there isn't the faintest hint that sex can be anything but man+woman.

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry - First time for everything. It's been a while since I've read such an extended exploration of the parable of the blind men and the elephant. Also, the further one reads, the more creepy that glass bell becomes. Ick ick ick.

A few Liaden books by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller: Fledgling, Saltation, and Ghost Ship, the first three Theo Waitley books, plus Agent of Change, from the main-line series. The first two are better, or at least were more self-contained -- when Theo discovers her heritage, the plotlines start splintering, apparently to encompass the continuing stories of characters who already have novels of their own. The last listed was the first published of the series, and has rough patches plus ends on a cliffhanger.

(Not that I'm feeling critical or anything.)

The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery - One of her novels for grownups, but Valancy's story liberation would surely be the perfect wish-fulfillment for the right sort of teen. Not to mention the sly, dark humor of it all. It doesn't hurt that this has some of the loveliest nature writing I've seen in quite some time. Delicious. I love it even more than Anne of Green Gables.

(See? Not critical at all.)

What I'm reading now:

Butterfly Swords by Jeannie Lin, an earlier Harlequin novel of hers -- one with more category Romance tropes and less wuxia than The Lotus Palace. This one's also set earlier historically, in the turbulence following the An Lushan rebellion (so set just after the central events of "The Song of Everlasting Regret"). I'm not entirely thrilled with the hero being Caucasian (apparently a Greek or Macedonian descended Bactrian, which is at least a plausible historical hack and does highlight Central Asian influences on Chinese culture -- and yet), and not finding the story compelling enough to read quickly.

(Well, maybe a little critical.)

What I might read next:

Dragon Ship by Lee & Miller, once my library reserve comes in, and How to Run with a Naked Werewolf, currently sitting on my dresser. Or maybe some more L.M. Montgomery.

---L.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Yotsuba runs)
This weekend is our local science fiction convention (40th year!) which promises to be a lot of fun. My current schedule:

Friday 8 Nov 5pm-5:50pm - Origami workshop ("learn how to fold origami" according to the official description)
Saturday 9 Nov 11am-11:50am - The dynamics of couples in adventure
Saturday 9 Nov 3pm-3:50pm - Don’t even tell them once (letting your audience figure it out for themselves)
Sunday 10 Nov 11am-11:50am - Vogon Poetry (very bad poetry round-robin)

If you're in the area, come on down. There's single-day passes, even. If you can't make it, here's some links to console yourself:

Moray eel feels pretty today. (via)

Bishônen W.B. Yeats, complete with bonus adorable chibis. rot13: Lrf, gung'f n puvov Znhq Tbaar. (via)

Timelapse from the Albuquerque balloon festival. (via)

---L.

Subject quote from "The Golden Legend," Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
larryhammer: a low-fidelity picture of a man, label: "some guy" (Yotsuba runs)
An interesting analysis of the visual rhetoric of the opening of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind. Good discussion in comments, too. (via)

A useful comic explaining the transgender experience with a simple analogy. (via)

An awesomesauce alt.country cover of Snoop Dogg's "Gin and Juice." (via)

---L.
larryhammer: a wisp of colored smoke, label: "softly and suddenly vanished away" (finished)
Alternities:

Special to [livejournal.com profile] asakiyume and anyone else interested in a lyrical study in small coincidences: then-n-now. (via)

In 1995, Hayao Miyazaki directed a music video: "On Your Mark." The song is bombastic pop-rock and the characters have the Three Standard Miyazaki Faces, but there is flight and redemption and multiple versions of the same story, all in six minutes. (via)

You only need to remember two things for a duel: dudes and swords. (via)

---L.
larryhammer: a wisp of colored smoke, label: "softly and suddenly vanished away" (finished)
Alternities:

Special to [livejournal.com profile] asakiyume and anyone else interested in a lyrical study in small coincidences: then-n-now. (via)

In 1995, Hayao Miyazaki directed a music video: "On Your Mark." The song is bombastic pop-rock and the characters have the Three Standard Miyazaki Faces, but there is flight and redemption and multiple versions of the same story, all in six minutes. (via)

You only need to remember two things for a duel: dudes and swords. (via)

---L.
larryhammer: Yotsuba Koiwai running, label: "enjoy everything" (enjoy everything)
... and it chills me to the bone / if you do not believe me / come and gaze upon the shadow at your door

It is sobering and mildly depressing to realize that my enjoyment of Tintin is hampered by the fact that I don't actually like Captain Haddock.

My favorite growing up was The Crab with the Golden Claws (which holds up moderately well, all things considered). What is (or was) yours?

---L.
larryhammer: Yotsuba Koiwai running, label: "enjoy everything" (enjoy everything)
... and it chills me to the bone / if you do not believe me / come and gaze upon the shadow at your door

It is sobering and mildly depressing to realize that my enjoyment of Tintin is hampered by the fact that I don't actually like Captain Haddock.

My favorite growing up was The Crab with the Golden Claws (which holds up moderately well, all things considered). What is (or was) yours?

---L.

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